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(480) 588-1364 / TLC House & Pet Sitting Service

Mittens is Typically Full of Personality

But My Cat is Shy for Strangers

You could have the sweetest cat in the world, but no one would ever know if kitty rushes to hide under the bed whenever there’s company! It’s fairly common for cats to be afraid of strangers, especially if they weren’t socialized as kittens or grew up on the streets. If your cat is shy, try the following tips to help your cat feel less shy around strangers.

Provide a Safe Space

Before your company arrives, designate a safe area for your cat. It could be in a back room or a quiet area of your house where your cat usually feels calm and likes to sleep. Then, let your company know about your cat’s safe space. Advise them not to disturb kitty when he or she goes back there to be alone. This will help ease feelings of anxiety in your cat. He or she will know that there’s always a safe escape if things get too exciting.

Avoid Loud Noises

Some cats are afraid of strangers because they associate them with scary noises. Instead of using the doorbell or buzzer, let your guests know ahead of time that they should call or text once they’ve arrived. Try to keep the noise level of your conversation low and laughters down to a quiet chuckle to keep from spooking your cat.

Let the Cat Come to You

It could take several visits before your cat comes out to say hello to your company, and that’s perfectly normal. Don’t force your cat to greet strangers by catching them and holding them once your guests arrive. Alternatively, you can give your visitors a handful of treats to put down if kitty ventures close to them. You can also leave a pile of treats halfway between the safe area and your guests’ area to encourage kitty to come a little closer.

Use the formal feline greeting

Once your kitty feels comfortable approaching your guests, coach them to extend one finger and wait for the cat’s response. Your cat will either brush his or her cheeks on the finger, which means he or she feels comfortable enough to be petted, or simply walk away if not. Once your cat indicates it’s okay to be petted, remind your guests not to overdo it. One gentle chin rub should be enough.

When it comes to cat sitting, it can take a little time for kitties warm up to their sitters, too. Let us know if your cat tends to be shy, and we’ll do everything possible to make him or her feel comfortable and secure during our visits.

Questions About Why Your Cat is Shy?

If you have any questions about why your cat is shy, or other questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com.