Nail Clipping for Dogs – Helpful Tips

Nail Clipping for Dogs – Helpful Tips

Nail Clipping for Dogs

At TLC, we know that your dogs are more than just pets; they are family members. And because you want to care for them like one of the family, you do what you can to make sure that they look and feel their best. Nail clipping for dogs is more than just a manicure for them. Learn why dogs need to have their nails clipped and common mistakes to avoid at home. Also, you can trust most professional groomers to offer nail clipping for dogs as part of their services.

Why Clip Your Dog’s Nails?

Did you know that nails that go unclipped can cause your dog pain? Many veterinarians warn that unclipped nails can turn their paws into a splayed foot which reduces traction. Unclipped nails for extended periods of time can also lead to deformed feet or injure the tendons causing pain.

New Clippers

If this is your first time clipping your dogs nails, purchasing clippers meant for dogs only is your fist step. Never use clippers meant for people.  When searching for a pair of clippers, find a pair that is comfortable and easy to control.  There are clippers available that are motorized, which can sometimes decrease the amount of time spent on each nail and make the process a bit smoother for your furry friend.  Grinding your dogs nails also mitigates the chance that you’ll cut them to the quick (which causes bleeding). Take a look here at the 2018 list of best nail grinders for dogs.

Nice And Slow

Don’t rush through the process of clipping your dog’s nails. If you do, then there is a chance that you could tear the nails or clip them  too short. This is one of the important nail clipping tips for dogs because cutting the nails too short can sometimes cause excessive bleeding. Make your dog feel like he is special for getting his nails clipped instead of making it seem like a chore or a common task. Prop your dog’s paws on your leg to allow for as much comfort as possible. An idea to consider is to let someone hold a spoon of peanut butter for your dog to lick on while you’re clipping his nails. Massage your dog’s legs to relieve some of the stress in the muscles, making it easier to approach the paws while clipping the nails.

Offer A Soothing Touch

Before using clippers, you can place an item that has a similar feeling on your dog’s paws. This simple action can get your dog accustomed to something being close to the nails and the feet. Try to let your dog get used to the sound associated with the clippers by squeezing them nearby, getting closer to your furry friend until you’re able to gently clip each nail.

For More Information

If you have questions about nail clipping for dogs or general questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com.

Raising a Puppy

Raising a Puppy

Raising a Puppy

If You Want a Great Dog, Raise a Good Puppy

Raising a puppy sounds like a good ole’ time of throwing a ball and watching him scurry after it. We all know how holding a sweet puppy can just melt your heart. However, there is so much more to raising a puppy. Becoming a responsible puppy owner requires a lot of work and patience. If you want a great dog, raise a good puppy.

Never Know “No!”

Your puppy was born into this world completely helpless and blind. Now, in your care, he is fully dependent on you to teach him about the world around him, as well as what behaviors are unacceptable. Unfortunately, many trainers using old, outdated methods still tell you that the first thing you should teach your puppy is the meaning of “No!” The science and theory of learning, however, states otherwise. A puppy learns quicker and far more consistently when you can prevent his bad behaviors and reward the good ones. This motivates him to perform good behaviors instead of focusing the bad behaviors. An excellent example of preventing bad behaviors would be the use of a crate or playpen for housebreaking. Keeping your puppy in a safe place while you cannot keep an eye on him prevents him from wondering into another room to potty. When you take him to the proper potty place, you can reward him for doing his business. With time and consistency, he will want to potty in the right place, because you have positively conditioned him to do so!

Training Starts Now

The very first thing you should do with your puppy is begin training. This does not mean that you should begin a full training session before stepping foot indoors, but it does mean that the moment your puppy becomes yours, you should jump straight into his schedule! Dogs rely on schedules, and your puppy is no different. If he is given the ability to potty at the correct times, eat at specific times and given ample exercise and play times you have already started training! Puppies learn from repetition, and a schedule will get his mind and body in sync with the schedule you have made for him.

Involve Everyone

Even if your puppy is meant to be yours and yours alone, ask others to chip in on his care. Puppy care can be a difficult and daunting task to do it right all alone. Puppies need a potty break every hour or hour-and-a-half. If this doesn’t fit your schedule, ask a close friend of family member to do it and get them involved in your puppy’s life. It will be both rewarding for you, your friend or family member as well as your puppy. There may be times when you cannot be there when your puppy is in need, and it is helpful for him to learn to continue his schedule, even when it is with another person.

It’s Cute Now, But Not Later

Your puppy’s jumping and barking may be cute now, but when that little Labrador grows into an extra-large canine, it will just be annoying! A large, or even medium sized dog can easily knock over a person, making it a dangerous behavior to learn. Begin your puppy’s obedience by reinforcing behaviors like: no pawing, jumping, or being forceful with others in order to get what he wants. It’s simple to teach. First, hold a toy or treat that your puppy wants and wait. Then, he will get excited, jump, bark, or even lay down. These are all typical behaviors puppies use to get what they want. Finally, the moment he gives up and looks the other way is the moment you reward him by giving him the treat or toy! Continue doing this throughout the day, especially during play sessions. He is learning that he must be polite and gentle to get what he wants.

Consistency is Always Key

You will hear this one a lot, but it is for good reason. If you let your puppy get away with something you have just reinforced bad behavior that you were working to change. Telling yourself, “It’s okay, just this one time,” will simply add confusion to your puppy’s understanding of boundaries. Stick with your puppy’s training regimen and schedule. Remember to keep it training fun. After all, it is just one big game to your puppy. With the right attitude, it can be a fun game for you, too!

For More Information

If you have questions about raising a puppy or general questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com.

Things to Consider Before Buying a New Pet

Things to Consider Before Buying a New Pet

Things to Consider When

Buying a New Pet

Buying a new pet? Introducing a new pet into your family is the same as bringing a new family member into your house. Pets do not just occupy space in your house but also in your daily life. You become responsible for your dog. This includes among your family members, your friends and the community you live in. That is why your choice of pet matters. When buying a pet, impulses and your love for them is strong. However, make sure you give them a good healthy life and a comforting home. There are many things to be considered before buying a new pet or adopting an animal.

Are your family members and the choice of your pet compatible?

The very first thing to consider is, whether the other family member in your house or anyone who shares the room with you is okay with having animals around them. Ask them if they have any special allergies with cats or dogs or any animal in general. If you have kids at home, make sure they are friendly and welcoming towards pets. This is important because your pet will not only be sharing its life with you, but also with everyone else living with you.

Is your house compatible with the choice of your pet?

Your pet may not have a say in choosing  where you live, but before bringing a pet home, it is important to make sure whether your place would be suitable for them or not. If you are getting a dog, you would have to make sure your house has enough space for them to play around, run and have their own little space.

You also have to make sure your house is fenced, so your pets do not get out. Moreover, the temperature of that place should also be considered. If you live in a place with a hot climate, it is essential for you to make a shady and cool living area for your pet so they can remain unaffected by the heat.

Does your community or your apartments allow pet?

It is understandable that you cannot get a pet if your housing community or your living facility does not allow pets in homes. There might be some exceptions even in such buildings, and they may allow some kind of animals as pet. So, it is better that before buying pet, you discuss it with your property owner about the rules and regulations related to keeping pets in your building.

Is your lifestyle compatible with your choice of pet?

We live in times where most of our time is spent outside of the home. We do not really have much time on our hands left by the end of the day and time is the most important thing your pet would want from you. Dogs are very friendly and they need you around them most of time. Therefore, if you know you cannot make time for them, you should not adopt a pet. However, if you already have decided to get one, then make sure you have someone at home to take care of it and take it on walks everyday in your absence.

Questions About Buying a New Pet?

If you have any questions about buying a new pet, or other questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com.

Socialization for Dogs

Socialization for Dogs

While many dog owners believe their dog to be the friendly sort, and they very well may be, the act of socialization goes far beyond just saying his to house guests. It goes beyond meeting new people, trips to the Dog Park and doggy play dates, too! Socialization includes items that may be strange to a dog, different floor textures, sounds that can be scary and more. You can start your dog, at any age, down the road to being well socialized with patience and care.

The Fear Periods

While all dogs are continuously learning throughout their lives, including socialization, the two fear periods in a puppy’s growth are probably the most impressionable. These two times in your puppy’s life are when objects, people, other animals and dogs can hardwire a certain emotion and reaction in your dog. The experiences he has during his fear periods are the ones that he will carry with him for the rest of his life, even the bad ones. This is why trainers, breeders, rescuers and veterinarians always stress socialization during puppy hood, because these emotions and behaviors that your puppy learns at this time become difficult to change in the future.

The first fear period will begin before your puppy is even weaned at four weeks old. If your puppy came from, or is coming from a breeder then it is up to your breeder to begin socialization at or before this time in your puppy’s life. The same can be said for a rescue or shelter! It is incredibly important for a puppy at the beginning of his four weeks of life to begin learning new things and have a positive exposure to things that may seem scary to a dog. This first fear period ends at about twelve weeks of age, which means you will receive your puppy during his first fear period! This is a prime opportunity to begin training immediately and form a wonderful bond with your puppy.

The second fear period is a guess, as each individual puppy may be slightly different. It can occur anywhere between seven and eight months of age and lasts for two weeks. During this time you may see more flighty behavior from your puppy, hence the name fear period! It helps to know your puppy well so you can realize quickly that he has entered his second fear period. While socialization should be taking part on a regular basis no matter what your dogs’ age is, this is the most ideal time to introduce him, or reinforce socialization with items and people specifically as well as work on preventative training so your dog will not become reactive in the future.

Exposure vs. Experience

Exposure is needed to socialize a dog, whether you are working on introducing him to umbrellas or other animals. However, exposure alone will not socialize your dog! The key to a well socialized dog is the brief, positive experience he goes through while the exposure is taking place. This does not mean you need to give your dog a treat after he cautiously explore a scary hat on the ground, but instead encourage him to explore it more and when he’s done give praise and move on. It literally can take minutes to socialize your dog with an item!

When it comes to socializing your dog with people, especially if you have a shy dog is not to force him to allow others to pet him. Forcing your dog to let strangers put their hands on him will work against you in socialization. If your dog is shy, let him just observe people, and when a stranger asks to pet your dog don’t feel obligated to let them. Just kindly tell the person your dog is in training, and most people will happily accept and understand to respect your dog’s space. When your dog becomes interested in the people, and not providing fearful or cautious behaviors, like leanings towards someone without stretching out his back legs (as this allows him a quick exit,) you can allow a person to pet him. Ask the person to kneel at his level, while providing their side not chest in his direction and let your dog approach. This makes the person look inviting instead of threatening, and gives your dog the ability to have a positive social experience with a stranger. Once should be plenty for a shy dog, but an outgoing pup may want to meet humans as many as possible!

Never Stop

Dogs learn for life. No dog is too old to learn new things, not even socialization! If you adopted an adult or senior dog, don’t feel as if you don’t need to help him become comfortable with new or strange things. Even if something is scary to him, he will love to learn something new and be more confident instead of fearful. Never stop teaching any dog new things, especially when it comes to socialization!

5 Warning Signs About Using To Many Dog Treats

5 Warning Signs About Using To Many Dog Treats

5 Warning Signs About Using To Many Dog Treats

If you have a dog you probably have some dog treats laying around. In fact some of my clients have so many dog treats that the dog really doesn’t need dog food because it is eating treats all day long. Giving your dog too many dog treats can cause all types of problems and here are some of the warning signs.

If you used treats to train your dog you’ll probably find that hTo many dog treates1. If you are giving your dog too many treats it probably has started demanding them for various different activities. For example you may find that your dog demands a treat when you come home or when you get up from taking a nap. I think you get the idea, the dog will figure out all types of situations that require treat.

2. If you used treats to train your dog you’ll probably find that he won’t sit, or down, or stay without a treat been involved. It’s simple, the reason for this is that you bribed him in the beginning and now he expects them all the time for accomplishing any of his obedience tasks.

3. If you’ve used treats to teach your dog to do his business you may find he is waking you up in the middle the night to take him outside, but he really didn’t need to go he just wanted his treat. This is another example of bribery that can backfire on you with your dog.

4. Okay now this one is serious. If your dog shows any sign of aggression with you, other family members, or other pets in the house over his treat or a bone then you need to eliminate treats until you can have the problem resolved with the help of a canine behavior specialist. Like I said this can be a serious problem and somebody or something can get hurt..

5. Last but not least. When that little pup of yours begins to look like a little rolly -polly ball because he’s so overweight then it’s really time to eliminate the treats. Giving your dog too many treats is definitely the way to put weight on your dog that it does not need.

So keep in mind when it comes to treats less is better and don’t let your dog trick you into giving it more than it should have.  I tell people that dogs are really smart and they are really good at training people.  In fact dogs are better at training people than people are at training dogs.

Are You Practicing Good Dog Owner Etiquette

Are You Practicing Good Dog Owner Etiquette

As a dog owner, it is very important that you practice good doggy manners.  “What does that mean?” you ask.  Here are a few pointers on being a good dog owner who shows good doggy etiquette.

Jumping On People

This is the one that is probably abused the most.  Yep, you walk into a home and here comes the dog, jumping all over you.  Some people say it’s okay because they are dog lovers but not everyone wants a dog jumping all over them.  In some cases, these over exuberant dogs actually knock people down. Depending on the person’s age, this could be very dangerous.  So how do you keep it from happening?  Put the dog on leash, so he cannot get to the person entering through the door.  In fact, teaching your dog to do a sit /stay while on the leash really comes in handy.  Eventually, once the proper door behavior has been learned, you may no longer use the leash.

Excessive Barking

If you have ever been the recipient of non-stop barking from a neighbor’s dog, you know what I mean when we talk about excessive barking.  We should all be good neighbors and bring our dogs in the house, especially during the evening so that our dogs are not disturbing the peace.  If you know a neighbor sleeps during the day, consider keeping your dog indoors throughout the day as well.  If necessary, crate your dog, and the neighbors will love you.  

Allowing Your Dog To Run Loose

Allowing your dog to run loose in most areas is not only against the law, it is also very dangerous for your dog.  Thousands of dogs a year are run over while roaming the streets.  A dog owner that cares for his dog will never allow his dog to run loose.  If your dog shows any type of aggression while running loose, you are vulnerable to a tremendous amount of liability, should your dog happen to bite a person or another dog.

Pick Up The Poop

This one is a real pain in the rear for a bunch of homeowners.  I know you have seen it, but hopefully you have not added to the problem by allowing your dog to poop without scooping it up.  This has become such a problem in some communities that all dogs in those communities are swabbed for DNA. Any waste material that has not been picked up is checked with the DNA on file, and the offending owner can be fined up to $500.  So, bag the poop to keep your neighborhood clean.

Practicing good doggy etiquette will provide a better sense of community for all dog owners and homeowners alike.

5 Things To Avoid When Adopting A Dog

5 Things To Avoid When Adopting A Dog

Adopting a dog from a shelter or a breed rescue is an excellent way find a pet, plus you’re saving a life in the process. However, there are a few things that you should avoid when adopting that new dog for your family.

Aggression With People

If the dog shows any type of aggression, no matter the age, do not adopt it. Although some may take issue with this advice, my stance is based on decades of experience. There are just too many sweetheart dogs out there that need good homes.  Your desire to rescue a dog does not have to come with the burden of caring for a dog that you already know is aggressive.

The Fearful Dog

Quite often I find new dog owners that have adopted a dog that appeared to have fearfulness.  Some of these adopted dogs were puppies. I’ve had clients tell me that when adopting their puppy, the observed the litter while seven of the pups ran up to them to play and one little scared puppy sat in the corner. You’d be amazed by how many people take home the afraid puppy, out of shear compassion.  However, my advice again would be to pass on adopting fearful dog.  Although it’s possible to help a scared dog interact like normal dogs, it’s unlikely. So my suggestion is to pick one of those outgoing puppies, one that adds to the love and overall happiness of the home.

Dog Aggression

If you already have a dog at home and want to add a new dog to your pack, then adopting a dog that is not dog-aggressive is a must. It’s always a good idea to introduce your new dog to your existing dog in a strange environment not at your home. So keep in mind that the first meeting should be at the local park or out for a walk. Make sure that the adoption agency is willing to take back the new dog if he shows any aggression with your existing dog at home.

An Unwell Dog

Needless to say, you do not want to accept a sick or unhealthy dog especially if you already have a dog at home. I do realize that there are those of you who are real rescuers and nurturers that will accept the challenges of caring for a sick dog in order to nurse it back to health. However, for the average pet owne,r that may be more of a task than they want to take on.

The Unsocialized Dog

When adopting your dog, keep in mind that the period of socialization is from birth to 20 weeks old. If you are adopting a puppy, you have to accomplish that before the five-month mark. If you are considering a puppy that has been at a shelter its entire life and has not been properly socialized that could be a mistake that you will have to live with for years, unless  there is still time to do it before the 20 week mark. On the other hand, if you’re choosing an older dog, you’ll be able to tell if he’s been socialized properly by his attitude around people and other dogs.

Adopting a dog can be a fantastic way to select a new best friend.  Just take your time and find the right dog that suits your lifestyle and your expectations. If you’ll follow this simple advice, you and you’re new best buddy will have a happy future together.

5 Tips for Preparing for a New AZ Puppy

5 Tips for Preparing for a New AZ Puppy

Scottsdale Family Prepares for a New Puppy

Scottsdale AZ puppyPuppy Preparedness Tips for Scottsdale AZ

  1. Family Puppy Meeting: who will feed the puppy and when, who will take the puppy out to potty and when, and who will take the little guy to the vet for vaccinations and deworming.  Another topic for discussion was an agreement on the language that the family will use to teach the puppy.
  2. Puppy Shopping: puppy food, food/water bowls, bedding, collar, leash, tags, crate, chew toys, and grooming supplies.
  3. Puppy-proofing a Scottsdale home: taping loose electrical cords to baseboards, putting poisonous chemicals out-of-reach, de-cluttering items within puppy’s reach, and putting up gates or a crate.
  4. In the beginning:  keep the same food brand and feeding schedule, then switched to a different food brand incrementally after about a week.
  5.  Maintaining a puppy routine: eating, sleeping, going potty, play time, time with the family and time alone helped their puppy to adapt to the new environment.

The arrival of a new puppy brought such delight to one Scottsdale AZ family’s home and preparing for the event helped the puppy and Scottsdale family to feel comfortable right away.

Scottsdale Arizona

Dog Care, Walking & Pet Sitting

(480) 588-1364

Bordetella: Does Your Dog Really Need the Kennel Cough Vaccine?

Bordetella: Does Your Dog Really Need the Kennel Cough Vaccine?

Bordetella: Does Your Dog Really Need the Kennel Cough Vaccine?

by JAN RASMUSEN on MARCH 22, 2012 · By dogs Naturally Magazine.

Permission from Jan Rasmusen at www.Truth4Dogs.com

Post image for Bordetella: Does Your Dog Really Need the Kennel Cough Vaccine?

Your veterinarian, kennel owner, day care provider or groomer says your dog should/must be vaccinated against kennel cough, but you’re trying not to over-vaccinate.

What should you do?

More and more, pet parents are finding another vet, kennel owner, day care provider or groomer — or keeping their dog at home!  Vaccination is a serious medical procedure with significant potential risks.  If that isn’t enough, the vaccine isunlikely to prevent kennel cough. It can even produce kennel-cough like symptoms. The WSAVA Guidelines say, “Transient (3–10 days) coughing, sneezing, or nasal discharge may occur in a small percentage of vaccinates.” It can also cause a serious anaphylactoid reaction. Look it up. You won’t like it.

About kennels, day care providers and groomers: In general, if they have good ventilation and practice good hygiene, kennel cough shouldn’t be an issue. Bordetella is not for dogs playing together in well-ventilated areas — like dog parks or backyards or living rooms.

Think of kennel cough as a canine cold, transmitted as human colds are transmitted — from an infected individual in close contact with another individual with compromised immunity.  Like a cold, it is also considered a mild self-limiting disease.  A veterinarian friend uses an OTC remedy called B & T Cough and Bronchial Syrup to treat the cough.  For small dogs she uses the children’s variety.  See your vet for further treatment information.

If your service provider is afraid your dog will contract kennel cough at their establishment, offer to sign a letter of informed consent saying you’ve been informed of the risk and will waive liability. That should do it.  Should.  It’s really just liability at issue, not your dog’s overall health.

If the person insisting on the Bordetella vaccine is afraid other dogs at their establishment will contract kennel cough from your unvaccinated dog, this person clearly doesn’t trust that thevaccinated dogs actually have immunity. If they don’t believe the vaccine is protective,  why insist that you or anyone else vaccinate?

Note: If you decide to give the vaccine, make sure it is the intranasal form, that is, given as nose drops, not injected.  And give the vaccine at least a week before contact with other dogs, for the sake of both your dog and other dogs.

Don’t take my word for any of this. Read what two vets and a PhD have to say about the Bordetella vaccine:

World-renowned vaccination scientist, Dr. Ronald Schultz, says [emphasis is mine]: “Many animals receive “kennel cough” vaccines that include Bordetella and CPI and/or CAV-2 every 6 to 9 monthswithout evidence that this frequency of vaccination is necessary or beneficial. In contrast, other dogs are never vaccinated for kennel cough and disease is not seen. CPI immunity lasts at least 3 years when given intranasally, and CAV -2 immunity lasts a minimum of 7 years parenterally for CAV-I. These two viruses in combination with Bordetella bronchiseptica are the agents most often associated with kennel cough, however, other factors play an important role in disease (e.g. stress, dust, humidity, molds, mycoplasma, etc.), thus kennel cough is not a vaccine preventable diseasebecause of the complex factors associated with this disease. Furthermore, this is often a mild to moderate self limiting disease. I refer to it as the ‘Canine Cold.’”

Crate Training Do’s and Don’ts

For pet owners, a crate may offer several benefits such as: aiding with house training (as dogs do not like to soil the area where they sleep), limiting their pets’ access to the rest of the house, and as a safe way to travel.  However, for a dog, a crate is much more.  Dogs are instinctively den animals.  Their crates serve as their “den.”  Dogs prefer using their crates as a safe place to sleep or take refuge, just as they would use a den to do so in the wild.

Crating Precautions

It is important for owners to foster that sense of security that a dog feels about their crate rather than creating a mood of feeling trapped or frustrated.  Some common mistakes that would cause a dog to experience anxiety while crating them would be: to use a crate as punishment, to leave a dog in their crate for too long without getting human interaction or exercise, confining puppies in crates for longer than 3 hours (which is too long for a puppy to be expected to hold his or her bladder).

Picking the Right Crate for Your Pet

A crate should be the right size for your dog, which would allow your dog to stand up and turn around comfortably.  A crate that is too large may be more difficult to use while house training a dog, since the dog may have room to potty in one corner and sleep in another.  Some options for puppy owners are: renting a smaller crate from a local animal shelter until their puppy is full grown, and then purchase a crate that is the right size for their full grown dog or simply blocking off the excess crate area while the puppy is small.

Crate Training Tips

Crate training should only take days or weeks depending on each individual dog.  Owners should make sure that the process is a positive one for the dog and that they are going at the dog’s pace and not forcing it.  Here are some simple steps to make the process go smoothly:

  1. 1.       Introduce the dog to their new crate- Place the crate in an area where the dog is comfortable and make the crate a relaxing get-away by placing a blanket, towel, toys, and/or treats inside.  The dog will become naturally curious about the crate and want to check it out.
  2. 2.       Feed near the crate- A dog will begin to develop a positive association between the crate and meal times, if fed nearby the crate.
  3. 3.       Start with short intervals- Owners should first crate their pets for short periods of time while still home, to get them used to the idea.
  4. 4.       Crate when leaving home- Once the dog has shown that he/she can be crated for longer and longer intervals without anxiety, then they are ready to be crated while the owner leaves home.  Owners can use a command and/or treat routinely to prompt their dogs to enter the crate.
  5. 5.       Crating through the night- At first, owners should place the crate near their bedrooms, so their pets can feel secure that they are close to their owners while still crated.  Puppies and older pets should be let out to potty even during the night, as their bladders are not capable of holding through the entire night.  The owner can then incrementally move the crate further and further away from the bedroom, once the pet has become accustomed to sleeping in the crate overnight.

Potential Side-Effects

Although crate training does offer many benefits to both owners and pets, owners should be aware of some side-effects along the way.  While crate training, puppies especially, may whine or cry.  Although it is important to make sure that you are not reinforcing the whining behavior by letting the dog out of the crate prematurely, it is also important to give the pet plenty of opportunities to potty.  One way to do so would be to have potty breaks at specific times so the pet has a routine, and knows to expect a potty break at a certain time rather than whenever he/she whines.  Another possible side-effect is separation anxiety, which may be managed through consulting with a professional animal-behavior specialist.  If a pet is displaying signs of hurting himself/herself while attempting to escape the crate or of being especially destructive, please seek help for your pet in order to overcome their separation anxiety.

Information obtained from Human Society 8/17/11.  For more information on this topic and many others, please visit their website at: www.humanesociety.org

 

Age Appropriate Pets for Your Child

When choosing a family pet, it is wise to take into consideration your child’s abilities and level of understanding in caring of your family pet.  The ASPCA offers some advice on choosing an age appropriate pet for your child as well as pointers on creating a positive relationship between your pet and your child.

Infants- If you already have a pet or if you acquire one while your child is an infant, be sure to closely monitor the time spent between your pet and baby.  They need time to spend short amounts of time together in order to get adjusted to each other.  The amount of time they are together can be increased over time, as they become more comfortable with each other.  Before bringing a new baby home to your pet, some suggest leaving one of the baby’s blankets with the pet, so they can become familiar with the new smell.

Toddlers, Age 1-3- Most toddlers will grab and pull on the ears, fur, legs and tail of your pet.  When adopting a new pet, keep this in mind and select a pet that has a high tolerance for this kind of interaction.  If adopting an older pet, be sure to choose one with a history of living with children.  Also, remember that your toddler will naturally be curious about the food dishes, water bowls, litter boxes, and fish tank equipment.  Keeping these things out of reach will allow for a safer environment for your pet and child.

Young Children, Age 3-5– Your young child may be interested in helping to care for your pet and is learning to develop empathy.  If you already have a pet, allowing your young child to assist you with feeding, brushing, and cleaning the pet will further develop these skills as well as strengthen the bond between your child and pet.  When considering a pet for your young child, ASPCA suggests you consider a guinea pig for your family pet.  They generally don’t bite, they love to be held, and they typically squeal or whistle when they are happy, which can be quite amusing for a young child.

Children Age 5-10– Children at this age are very interested in caring for their pets, with a parent’s supervision.  As they assist in feeding, cleaning, and grooming chores, parents are encouraged to reinforce good hygiene for both the pets and themselves.  When choosing a pet for a child at this age, the ASPCA recommends small pets such as gerbils or fish, as children this age tend to have “inconsistent attention spans.”

Pre-Teen Age 10-13– Preteen youths are often times very engaged in caring for their pets and are fully capable of doing so.  At this age, a pre-teen is usually ready to care for a pet which requires a significant amount of care and attention such as: a dog, cat, rabbit, etc.  Parental supervision is encouraged to ensure pets are not neglected. When choosing a pet for your child at this age, consider your child’s lifestyle and interests.  Active pre-teens should be paired with active pets, such as a playful puppy.  Children who are looking for a pet to love, groom, pet, etc. would be better paired with an older dog or cat that is friendly with children.

Teens Age 13-17– Your teen may love pets and be responsible enough to care for a pet on their own.  At this age, one thing to keep in mind is that your teen may have a very busy lifestyle, with little time to care for a pet.  Also, when selecting a teen’s pet, consider the expected life-span of that pet, and plans for that pet’s care when your teen leaves the home for college.  Some pets such as: lizards and fish may be the perfect pet for your teen and their busy, on-the-go lifestyle.

By understanding how to create a positive relationship between your children and pets, you will allow for a happier, safer home for your entire family.

For more information on this topic and many others, please visit the ASPCA website at: www.aspca.org

 

 

 

Fun things to do with your dog: Games, Sports and Just Good Fun

Here are some games you can play with your dogs to help with training, fun and exercise for you and your dog.

  • Agility– in, out, over and through this sport is all about working as a team
  • Animal Assisted Activities and Animal Assisted Therapy– the warm head of a friendly pet can soothe a lonely heart
  • Bikejoring– some dogs love to run. Adding the responsibility of teamwork adds to the fun.
  • Canicross– dog powered running for those who want to share their running goals with their best friend
  • Carting– channel the desire to pull into harness work that lets the dog feel useful and skilled
  • Coursing and racing– root instinct drives the joy of running with purpose in coursing and racing
  • Day trips and vacations– the dogs need not be left behind, bring them along for even more fun
  • Disc Dog or Flying Disc– if there was ever meaning to jump for joy this is it, jumping with achievement
  • Dock Jumping or Dock Diving– dogs who excel in this sport are love to show they can do it further and better
  • Dog Camps – Activity Sampler– too many choices? take a vacation with your dog and sample a variety
  • Dog Parks and Dog Walks: Socialization and Off-leash Play– a joy for the social dog, think tot lot
  • Dog Scootering– some dogs love to run. Adding the responsibility of teamwork adds to the fun.
  • Earthdog Trials– instinct, drive, and flying dirt – what more could an earthdog want
  • Flyball– excitement, speed, and focus, a sport for dogs driven to do it faster
  • Flygility– racing and teamwork to build confidence and a sense of belonging
  • Games– the most basic of interactions, fun ways of practicing skills of hunting, fetching, working together
  • Herding– it’s all about the dog’s instinct and desire to control and direct movement for the pack leader
  • Hiking, Backpacking and Dog Walks– sharing our quiet moments, our contemplations is the essence of being a pack
  • Hunt and Field Trials– working as a team is what drives these dogs
  • Kids and Dogs– dogs and kids can be a wonderful pairing with a little learning to keep it safe and fun
  • Mushing– for dogs who love to pull and people who want to let them
  • Musical Freestyle– the ultimate in teamwork is working with rhythm and coordination
  • Obedience– precision, focus and a great activity for perfectionist dogs, those who love to get it exactly right
  • Performance Art (Tricks)– curiosity and a willingness to try new things makes this fun
  • Pet Facilitated Therapy– for the dog who loves attention what better way to get it than visiting people in need
  • Precision Drill Teams– the excitement of success, of meeting a challenge and being a part of the team
  • Pulling– great for dogs who love to pull, and people who want to let them
  • Racing– for the dogs who love not just running but being faster than the next one
  • Rally Obedience– more focus on teamwork, less focus on precision, fun and relaxed for human and dog
  • Ring Sport– a sport that says “I can be a contributing member of the family” Some dogs thrive on responsibility
  • Rollerblade– a fun way for dogs and humans to share exercise and fresh air
  • Schutzhund– tracking, obedience, protection, schutzhund is all about what a well rounded dog is all about
  • Search and Rescue– for some making a difference is important, that includes dogs, they know it matters
  • Skijoring– dogs love to pull, people love to ski. Put the two together and you have skijoring.
  • Sledding
  • Sniffer Dog
  • Stock Dog Trials
  • Tracking
  • Treibball– herding balls instead of sheep
  • Visiting Pets
  • Water Work
  • Weight Pulling

suggestions are from http://www.dogplay.com/