Why Not a Dog Park?

Why Not a Dog Park?

Why Not a Dog Park?

The Reasons We Warn Against Them

When we think about taking our dog to a dog park we begin to conjure ideas of our pet frolicking with other dogs.  We tend to believe that this will be a great experience for them and that they’ll be a happier dog for having had the experience.  This couldn’t be more untrue.  Furthermore, we warn against taking your dog – and especially a puppy – to a dog park!

Hazards and Risks at a Dog Park Outweigh the Benefits

In March of 2018, in California, a small dog was attacked by two larger dogs at Lodi park and was fatally wounded.  While this is an extreme example, it is not uncommon for injuries to occur to dogs at dog parks.  Injuries can sometimes occur because of the co-mingling of large and small dogs.  In other cases, dog fights erupt between same-sized dogs as they try to assert themselves.  If your pet is not well trained for the type of interaction that occurs in a dog park, altercations will occur.

Like People, Not All Dogs Want to Be Social with Everyone They Meet

For some dogs, taking them to a dog park can make them extremely anxious.  It is like being afraid of the water and being pushed into the pool for them. 

Like people, some dogs prefer the comfort of familiar faces or only in small numbers.  Just as we do not chat with everyone we meet, our dogs do not have to play with every dog they meet.  The pressure to do so can make them uncomfortable or aggressive.  Rather than place our pups in this position, find a more suitable alternative.  For instance, schedule a few minutes with the neighbor’s dog every week. This may be all the socialization your dog needs- or wants.  Older dogs, especially, tend to prefer to go without playful interaction with other dogs.

The goal is to ensure that your dog feels relaxed and can leave at any time they start to feel uncomfortable.  Other options include pet socialization classes where the number of dogs is limited and it is monitored in a controlled environment by pet professionals.

Germs, Illness, and Parasites

If that doesn’t get your attention, we’re not sure what will.  Did you know that viruses can live in the soil of the dog park for an extended period of time?  This is true for any soil. This makes dog parks a veritable breeding ground for all types of viruses and parasites.  Because shot records are not required at the door, your pup could be mingling with unvaccinated or unhealthy animals.  This is especially dangerous to a new pup who has not yet completed his full schedule of vaccinations. This pup is therefore more susceptible to the germs.  Safer spaces for your pets include training classes, doggy day care, or boarding kennels where shot records are required prior to entry.

Anti-Training

The energy in a dog park can often be frantic and chaotic.  It doesn’t take long for a dog to get reinforcement from the experience that this behavior is acceptable. This teaches them that their owner has little or no control over them.  If you’ve visited a dog park, you’ve noticed at least one frustrated owner trying to get their dogs attention. It is usually to no avail.  This behavior can often carry over at home.  Undoing what the dog park has taught your dog can be frustrating for both you and your dog.

Elevated Protective Behaviors

Does your dog guard their toys?  Do they maybe even guard you a little?  Does your pet tend to want to keep the water bowl to themselves?  Is your dog the bully of the playground?  Dogs can be instinctual when it comes to guarding their resources.  If another animal tries to take what they believe is theirs it can result in a combative response.

Lasting Trauma

A young dog may feel long-term affects of an unpleasant experience at a dog park.  If they are attacked, especially unprovoked, your dog may begin exhibiting aggressive behavior of their own.  As a human, you may witness what you believe to be a small event happening to your dog that unexpectedly has lasting affects.  These incidents are likened to childhood trauma in humans.  Similar to someone playfully jumping out from behind a corner and yelling “Boo” to a small child who is too young to understand that won’t always happen again, but feels forever as if it will.

Inattentive Owners

All types of dogs come to a dog park.  The same is true for the owners.  There are some great dog owners who watch after their pets.  They keep an eye on them, break up incidents before they escalate, pick-up their messes, watch for inappropriate play or behavior, and are simply aware of their animals.  On the other hand, some owners spend more time on their phones or talking to other people to be bothered with their pet.  In these cases, their dog is left unchecked and can often create the problems mentioned above that you and your dog are trying to avoid.

To be safe, we recommend that you skip the dog park altogether and find better, safer alternatives for your pet.

For More Information

If you have questions about dog parks or general questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com. View more of our articles on pets here.

Holiday Foods for Pets

Holiday Foods for Pets

Holiday Foods for Pets

What’s Safe and What to Avoid

With the holidays rapidly approaching, you may be doing a lot of menu planning.  Many of the holidays have traditions surrounding food, and none more so than Thanksgiving. You may be already aware that there are many foods unsafe for your pet. However, this list will show you that it is possible to prepare holiday food for pets that is delicious and safe for them.

Turkey

What would a Thanksgiving meal be without turkey? Luckily, the meat from this bird is safe for your pets as long as it is thoroughly cook. It should also be given without the skin. Of course, never give your dog the bones from the turkey. Bones can splinter easily becoming sharp weapons in your dog’s delicate digestive tract. In order to qualify as a good Thanksgiving food for pets, the turkey meat should be unseasoned.

Sweet Potatoes

There are several traditional Thanksgiving vegetables that your pets can enjoy with you.  Sweet potatoes are often a pup favorite.  They are rich in many nutrients, such as Vitamins A and C, fiber, and potassium.  Most dogs will gladly chow down on some raw or dried pieces of sweet potato. You do not want to give your dog the canned kind or any that have been baked with marshmallows.  Most marshmallows contain Xylitol, which is toxic for dogs.  Your pets also do not need the additional sugar that is often found in sweet potato casseroles.  

Want to make a home made treat for your pup for the holidays?  Enjoy this recipe for a DIY Sweet Potato Dog Chew.

Green Beans

Another great veggie to share with your pets is green beans. They are high in both fiber and Vitamins C and K. The trick here is to feed them to your dog while you are cooking up your green bean casserole. Your pet will much prefer the raw, crisp version over the finished product. If your secret green bean casserole recipe involves onions or mushrooms, it is even more important to not let your dog sample it, as these ingredients are toxic to them.

Pumpkin

This fall classic is often one of the first foods to make an appearance at the holidays. That being said, feeding your animals leftover pumpkins from Halloween is not advised and could make your pet very ill.  You can, however, feed them pure fresh pumpkin. This holiday food for pets can be either raw or cooked, but it should not contain any added sugar or spices.

Bread

The bread debate; should I or shouldn’t I?  Dogs are not going to get much nutritional value out of bread (just like us).  Feeding your pup small servings of white bread or dinner rolls from time to time won’t hurt them.  It won’t help them either.  Bread is a filler food and doesn’t contain any extra nutrients that they are not already getting from their daily dog food diet.  There can be significant health risks, however, from bread dough or not fully cooked bread.  The yeast in many breads, if uncooked, will continue to rise once it enters your pets tummy.  Read more about bread and your dog here from the American Kennel Club.

Avoid Feeding Your Pets These Foods, Any Time of Year

Walnuts and Raisins

Many people know that raisins and grapes are dangerous for dogs.  These mini treats pack a punch to your pups kidneys. Avoid them always.  What many people do not know is that several types of nuts, in particular walnuts, are also very dangerous.  For more information on nuts and pets, reading this article will help.

Mac and Cheese

This holiday food for pets should be approached with caution. There is a debate on mac and cheese in the pet community. Dogs and cats do not need a daily dose of dairy products.  But some sure do love it!  However, some pets, even cats, can become intolerant of dairy products.  This is especially true in older pets.  In these cases, even small amounts of mac and cheese could result in gas, vomiting, and diarrhea.  You know your pet best, if their tummies can handle it, keep the treat to one small serving.  

Mashed Potatoes with Garlic and Onion

Garlic and onion can make your dogs very ill. Even the powdered versions can wreak havoc on your pets body.  Further, raw potatoes should be avoided as they contain an element toxic to animals; solanine.  If your pet loves potatoes, be sure that they are fully baked or boiled (and cooled) before serving to your furry friend.  Skip the salt and butter, too, for the best version for Fido.

As always, for items that may affect the health and safety of your pet, consult with your veterinarian. 

For More Information

If you have questions about holiday foods for pets or general questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com.

Nail Clipping for Dogs – Helpful Tips

Nail Clipping for Dogs – Helpful Tips

Nail Clipping for Dogs

At TLC, we know that your dogs are more than just pets; they are family members. And because you want to care for them like one of the family, you do what you can to make sure that they look and feel their best. Nail clipping for dogs is more than just a manicure for them. Learn why dogs need to have their nails clipped and common mistakes to avoid at home. Also, you can trust most professional groomers to offer nail clipping for dogs as part of their services.

Why Clip Your Dog’s Nails?

Did you know that nails that go unclipped can cause your dog pain? Many veterinarians warn that unclipped nails can turn their paws into a splayed foot which reduces traction. Unclipped nails for extended periods of time can also lead to deformed feet or injure the tendons causing pain.

New Clippers

If this is your first time clipping your dogs nails, purchasing clippers meant for dogs only is your fist step. Never use clippers meant for people.  When searching for a pair of clippers, find a pair that is comfortable and easy to control.  There are clippers available that are motorized, which can sometimes decrease the amount of time spent on each nail and make the process a bit smoother for your furry friend.  Grinding your dogs nails also mitigates the chance that you’ll cut them to the quick (which causes bleeding). Take a look here at the 2018 list of best nail grinders for dogs.

Nice And Slow

Don’t rush through the process of clipping your dog’s nails. If you do, then there is a chance that you could tear the nails or clip them  too short. This is one of the important nail clipping tips for dogs because cutting the nails too short can sometimes cause excessive bleeding. Make your dog feel like he is special for getting his nails clipped instead of making it seem like a chore or a common task. Prop your dog’s paws on your leg to allow for as much comfort as possible. An idea to consider is to let someone hold a spoon of peanut butter for your dog to lick on while you’re clipping his nails. Massage your dog’s legs to relieve some of the stress in the muscles, making it easier to approach the paws while clipping the nails.

Offer A Soothing Touch

Before using clippers, you can place an item that has a similar feeling on your dog’s paws. This simple action can get your dog accustomed to something being close to the nails and the feet. Try to let your dog get used to the sound associated with the clippers by squeezing them nearby, getting closer to your furry friend until you’re able to gently clip each nail.

For More Information

If you have questions about nail clipping for dogs or general questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com.

Fun Things to Do With Your Dog

Sports, Games and Just Plain Fun

Looking for some fun things to do with your dog?  Think you’ve tried it all?  We’ve compiled a list of activities that should keep you both pretty busy! This list will help with training, exercise, and overall fun for you and your dog.

  • Agility– in, out, over and through this sport is all about working as a team
  • Animal Assisted Activities and Animal Assisted Therapy– the warm head of a friendly pet can soothe a lonely heart
  • Bikejoring– some dogs love to run. Adding the responsibility of teamwork adds to the fun.
  • Canicross– dog powered running for those who want to share their running goals with their best friend
  • Carting– channel the desire to pull into harness work that lets the dog feel useful and skilled
  • Coursing and racing– root instinct drives the joy of running with purpose in coursing and racing
  • Day trips and vacations– the dogs need not be left behind, bring them along for even more fun
  • Disc Dog or Flying Disc– if there was ever meaning to jump for joy this is it, jumping with achievement
  • Dock Jumping or Dock Diving– dogs who excel in this sport are love to show they can do it further and better
  • Dog Camps – Activity Sampler– too many choices? take a vacation with your dog and sample a variety
  • Dog Parks and Dog Walks: Socialization and Off-leash Play– a joy for the social dog, think tot lot
  • Dog Scootering– some dogs love to run. Adding the responsibility of teamwork adds to the fun.
  • Earthdog Trials– instinct, drive, and flying dirt – what more could an earthdog want
  • Flyball– excitement, speed, and focus, a sport for dogs driven to do it faster
  • Flygility– racing and teamwork to build confidence and a sense of belonging
  • Games– the most basic of interactions, fun ways of practicing skills of hunting, fetching, working together
  • Herding– it’s all about the dog’s instinct and desire to control and direct movement for the pack leader
  • Hiking, Backpacking and Dog Walks– sharing our quiet moments, our contemplations is the essence of being a pack
  • Hunt and Field Trials– working as a team is what drives these dogs
  • Kids and Dogs– dogs and kids can be a wonderful pairing with a little learning to keep it safe and fun
  • Mushing– for dogs who love to pull and people who want to let them
  • Musical Freestyle– the ultimate in teamwork is working with rhythm and coordination
  • Obedience– precision, focus and a great activity for perfectionist dogs, those who love to get it exactly right
  • Performance Art (Tricks)– curiosity and a willingness to try new things makes this fun
  • Pet Facilitated Therapy– for the dog who loves attention what better way to get it than visiting people in need
  • Precision Drill Teams– the excitement of success, of meeting a challenge and being a part of the team
  • Pulling– great for dogs who love to pull, and people who want to let them
  • Racing– for the dogs who love not just running but being faster than the next one
  • Rally Obedience– more focus on teamwork, less focus on precision, fun and relaxed for human and dog
  • Ring Sport– a sport that says “I can be a contributing member of the family” Some dogs thrive on responsibility
  • Rollerblade– a fun way for dogs and humans to share exercise and fresh air
  • Schutzhund– tracking, obedience, protection, schutzhund is all about what a well rounded dog is all about
  • Search and Rescue– for some making a difference is important, that includes dogs, they know it matters
  • Skijoring– dogs love to pull, people love to ski. Put the two together and you have skijoring.
  • Sledding
  • Sniffer Dog
  • Stock Dog Trials
  • Tracking
  • Treibball– herding balls instead of sheep
  • Visiting Pets
  • Water Work
  • Weight Pulling

These suggestions are thanks to http://www.dogplay.com/

Choosing a Pet Sitter That Your Dog Will Love

Choosing a Pet Sitter That Your Dog Will Love

Choosing a Pet Sitter

That Your Dog will Love

In today’s busy world, it often becomes difficult to care for your pet the way you’d want to. So enters a positive alternative; a doting pet sitter. Choosing a pet sitter that your dog will love may seem daunting. With the right tools, you’ll be all set to make a choice that your furry friend will love. Read on for what to consider when looking for a pet sitter.

You are looking for someone to take care of your pet in your absence, and you have to make sure you leave this responsibility to someone who is responsible enough to treat your pet as their own. Before hiring a pet sitter, ask around about the sitters offering their services in the vicinity. If they have an online page, look for testimonials and reviews by their previous clients. Moreover, make sure you meet them once or twice in person before you finally hand them the responsibility to take care of your pet. Do not hire a sitter who has no prior experience with animals because even a minor careless act from their side can be dangerous for your pet.

2.      See How Resourceful They Are

See how knowledgeable your pet sitter is and we’re not talking about the general knowledge here only. A good pet sitter must have thorough knowledge about animal care, with a good understanding of ergonomics. Ask your pet sitter if they know the safety measures to be taken in emergency or if they know where to take the pet if something goes wrong with it. Check if they have a sound understanding of animal psychology to respond to your pet’s separation anxiety or changes in its moods. If you feel like the sitter has enough knowledge to be trusted, hire them.

3.      Do They Have a Pet Friendly Home

Leaving your pet in someone’s care is not an easy thing for a pet owner. Not being sure if your pet would be safe while you are away can add extra mental burden. A pet friendly home lessens that burden by assuring you pet security. Make sure the sitter’s house is equipped with all essential safety measures for the pet. If there is a yard, make sure it is pet-protected with high fences and no loose wires hanging here and there. As for interior, it would be better if there is paw-friendly flooring and small carved out spaces for pets to hide in, otherwise chances are they will end up stuck behind the washing machines, sofas and what not.

4.      They Should Genuinely Love Animals

Dogs have a strong sense of judgment and they would know who is friendly enough to take care of them. Dogs can sense it on people if they have pet aversion and they will act distant around them. When choosing a pet sitter, make sure they genuinely love pets, especially cats and dog. Also, make sure is the sitter is patient with the animals. You do not want someone to scare off your pet while you are away.

Things to Consider Before Buying a New Pet

Things to Consider Before Buying a New Pet

Things to Consider When

Buying a New Pet

Buying a new pet? Introducing a new pet into your family is the same as bringing a new family member into your house. Pets do not just occupy space in your house but also in your daily life. You become responsible for your dog. This includes among your family members, your friends and the community you live in. That is why your choice of pet matters. When buying a pet, impulses and your love for them is strong. However, make sure you give them a good healthy life and a comforting home. There are many things to be considered before buying a new pet or adopting an animal.

Are your family members and the choice of your pet compatible?

The very first thing to consider is, whether the other family member in your house or anyone who shares the room with you is okay with having animals around them. Ask them if they have any special allergies with cats or dogs or any animal in general. If you have kids at home, make sure they are friendly and welcoming towards pets. This is important because your pet will not only be sharing its life with you, but also with everyone else living with you.

Is your house compatible with the choice of your pet?

Your pet may not have a say in choosing  where you live, but before bringing a pet home, it is important to make sure whether your place would be suitable for them or not. If you are getting a dog, you would have to make sure your house has enough space for them to play around, run and have their own little space.

You also have to make sure your house is fenced, so your pets do not get out. Moreover, the temperature of that place should also be considered. If you live in a place with a hot climate, it is essential for you to make a shady and cool living area for your pet so they can remain unaffected by the heat.

Does your community or your apartments allow pet?

It is understandable that you cannot get a pet if your housing community or your living facility does not allow pets in homes. There might be some exceptions even in such buildings, and they may allow some kind of animals as pet. So, it is better that before buying pet, you discuss it with your property owner about the rules and regulations related to keeping pets in your building.

Is your lifestyle compatible with your choice of pet?

We live in times where most of our time is spent outside of the home. We do not really have much time on our hands left by the end of the day and time is the most important thing your pet would want from you. Dogs are very friendly and they need you around them most of time. Therefore, if you know you cannot make time for them, you should not adopt a pet. However, if you already have decided to get one, then make sure you have someone at home to take care of it and take it on walks everyday in your absence.

Questions About Buying a New Pet?

If you have any questions about buying a new pet, or other questions about pet care, you can contact Kara Jenkins, Owner of TLC Pet Sitter. We are also available by email at info@tlcpetsitter.com.

Are You Practicing Good Dog Owner Etiquette

Are You Practicing Good Dog Owner Etiquette

As a dog owner, it is very important that you practice good doggy manners.  “What does that mean?” you ask.  Here are a few pointers on being a good dog owner who shows good doggy etiquette.

Jumping On People

This is the one that is probably abused the most.  Yep, you walk into a home and here comes the dog, jumping all over you.  Some people say it’s okay because they are dog lovers but not everyone wants a dog jumping all over them.  In some cases, these over exuberant dogs actually knock people down. Depending on the person’s age, this could be very dangerous.  So how do you keep it from happening?  Put the dog on leash, so he cannot get to the person entering through the door.  In fact, teaching your dog to do a sit /stay while on the leash really comes in handy.  Eventually, once the proper door behavior has been learned, you may no longer use the leash.

Excessive Barking

If you have ever been the recipient of non-stop barking from a neighbor’s dog, you know what I mean when we talk about excessive barking.  We should all be good neighbors and bring our dogs in the house, especially during the evening so that our dogs are not disturbing the peace.  If you know a neighbor sleeps during the day, consider keeping your dog indoors throughout the day as well.  If necessary, crate your dog, and the neighbors will love you.  

Allowing Your Dog To Run Loose

Allowing your dog to run loose in most areas is not only against the law, it is also very dangerous for your dog.  Thousands of dogs a year are run over while roaming the streets.  A dog owner that cares for his dog will never allow his dog to run loose.  If your dog shows any type of aggression while running loose, you are vulnerable to a tremendous amount of liability, should your dog happen to bite a person or another dog.

Pick Up The Poop

This one is a real pain in the rear for a bunch of homeowners.  I know you have seen it, but hopefully you have not added to the problem by allowing your dog to poop without scooping it up.  This has become such a problem in some communities that all dogs in those communities are swabbed for DNA. Any waste material that has not been picked up is checked with the DNA on file, and the offending owner can be fined up to $500.  So, bag the poop to keep your neighborhood clean.

Practicing good doggy etiquette will provide a better sense of community for all dog owners and homeowners alike.

5 Things To Avoid When Adopting A Dog

5 Things To Avoid When Adopting A Dog

Adopting a dog from a shelter or a breed rescue is an excellent way find a pet, plus you’re saving a life in the process. However, there are a few things that you should avoid when adopting that new dog for your family.

Aggression With People

If the dog shows any type of aggression, no matter the age, do not adopt it. Although some may take issue with this advice, my stance is based on decades of experience. There are just too many sweetheart dogs out there that need good homes.  Your desire to rescue a dog does not have to come with the burden of caring for a dog that you already know is aggressive.

The Fearful Dog

Quite often I find new dog owners that have adopted a dog that appeared to have fearfulness.  Some of these adopted dogs were puppies. I’ve had clients tell me that when adopting their puppy, the observed the litter while seven of the pups ran up to them to play and one little scared puppy sat in the corner. You’d be amazed by how many people take home the afraid puppy, out of shear compassion.  However, my advice again would be to pass on adopting fearful dog.  Although it’s possible to help a scared dog interact like normal dogs, it’s unlikely. So my suggestion is to pick one of those outgoing puppies, one that adds to the love and overall happiness of the home.

Dog Aggression

If you already have a dog at home and want to add a new dog to your pack, then adopting a dog that is not dog-aggressive is a must. It’s always a good idea to introduce your new dog to your existing dog in a strange environment not at your home. So keep in mind that the first meeting should be at the local park or out for a walk. Make sure that the adoption agency is willing to take back the new dog if he shows any aggression with your existing dog at home.

An Unwell Dog

Needless to say, you do not want to accept a sick or unhealthy dog especially if you already have a dog at home. I do realize that there are those of you who are real rescuers and nurturers that will accept the challenges of caring for a sick dog in order to nurse it back to health. However, for the average pet owne,r that may be more of a task than they want to take on.

The Unsocialized Dog

When adopting your dog, keep in mind that the period of socialization is from birth to 20 weeks old. If you are adopting a puppy, you have to accomplish that before the five-month mark. If you are considering a puppy that has been at a shelter its entire life and has not been properly socialized that could be a mistake that you will have to live with for years, unless  there is still time to do it before the 20 week mark. On the other hand, if you’re choosing an older dog, you’ll be able to tell if he’s been socialized properly by his attitude around people and other dogs.

Adopting a dog can be a fantastic way to select a new best friend.  Just take your time and find the right dog that suits your lifestyle and your expectations. If you’ll follow this simple advice, you and you’re new best buddy will have a happy future together.

What Does A Pet Sitter Do?

What Does A Pet Sitter Do?

Pet sitting is just opening the door, petting the dog on the head and letting him out for a potty break, right?tlc-newlogosm_opt

Maybe in the old days when pet owners went on vacation and asked a neighbor to look in every now and then. Today, however, our cherished members of the family demand the attentions of professional pet sitters.

At TLC House & Pet Sitting Service our sitters visit dogs up to three times a day and cats once or twice a day. Love and attention along with the providing of fresh food, water and exercise are just the beginning of our service. TLC sitter/walkers are experienced and know what  to do while look after your pet’s individual needs. We administer medicines, both orally and by injection (for insulin), according to your instructions with prescribed dosages. All the care you provide your pet is performed in your absence by our sitters/walkers on your pet’s regular schedule.

We will walk dogs privately in your neighborhood after learning your dog’s commands and leash etiquette with your consultation. We dispose of all dog poop and cat litter boxes. If your pet requires overnight attention we will be there for that as well. We prepare detailed reports on your pet during your absence – and we can check in with nervous parents!

While we are visiting TLC sitter/walker do those little things to keep your house looking lived in – hauling trash cans to and from the curb, bringing in the mail, alternating lights, picking up newspapers and watering plants. But even with all that we never forget the pat on the head – just like the old days.

 

In-Home Pet Care, Dog Walking

Tempe, Gilbert and Chandler, Arizona

480-588-1364

Top Reasons Why A Pet Sitter is Better Than A Boarding Kennel

Top Reasons Why A Pet Sitter is Better Than A Boarding Kennel

What is the difference between boarding and Pet sitting in Tempe, ArizonaP1020618

No one likes to leave a beloved family member behind when they leave the house. For decades the only choice pet owners had to care for their animals during a vacation was a boarding kennel or cattery. Now there are also professional pet sitters to provide care and companionship. What’s the difference?

Routine. We all get a bit cranky when our daily routine gets thrown out of whack. Animals are no different. A pet sitter will provide feeding, exercise and bathroom breaks on the schedule you have set up for your pet. At a kennel these needs are met on their schedule.

Reduce Stress. Keeping a regular schedule and same diet is especially important for any pet especially a puppy or kitten.

Same Environment. Staying in the familiar home environment will also reduce any stress on your pet during your absence. And who doesn’t prefer sleeping in his or her own bed – or couch, as your dog prefers?

Personal Attention. Even the best-staffed boarding kennels cannot deliver the same one-on-one attention as a pet sitter provides your dog or cat. A pet sitter will also be equipped to better handle special needs. At TLC House & Pet Sitting we can also stay with your pet through the night. 

Multiple Pets. According to statistics from the American Pet Product Manufacturers Association half of all pet owners keep both cats and dogs in the house. Throw in fish and birds and reptiles and you have a menagerie that no boarding facility can handle.

Diseases. The close living quarters of a kennel promotes the spread of contagious diseases. You may not want to expose your pet, especially vulnerable young animals, to these conditions. Or you may not want to give your dog the vaccinations that some facilities require. 

Communication. There is no substitute for Peace of Mind when you are away from your pet. At TLC lines are always open to your pet sitter with voicemail, texting and daily notes.

Other Services. During a home visit a pet sitter can gather mail, water plants and generally keep your house looking “lived-in” while you are away.

 

In-Home Pet Care, Dog Walking

Scottsdale, Arizona

480-588-1364

 

 

TLC Pet Sitter Consult

TLC Pet Sitter Consult

Review About Pet Sitting 

This is a quote from  one of our new clients about using  our pet sitting service for the first time.

 Here is her testimonial:  

“Our consultation with the sitter was SUCH a pleasant & comforting surprise, because I had never used a pet-sitting service before, & every friend & family member who knew my pets were ALSO going away to the same place I was going! I admit that I was nervous UNTIL our consultation when my pets gravitated to Amanda!!Tempe pet sitter

Peg M, June 2013

 

In-Home Pet Care, Dog Walking

Chandler, Arizona

480-588-1364

Importance of Cat Litter Scooping

Your cat is a marvel of consistency – sleeps in the same place, eats the same amount of food and drinks the same amount of water. Every day. This love of routine can make it easy to spot early indicators that your cat’s health may not be right. And those telltale signs are often waiting in your cat’s litter box.

 TLC offers regular litter box cleaning as part of our service. But it is more than just changing the litter. Our sitters are trained to monitor the scoops they make each visit. Among the things we look for are color (signs of blood in the urine or stool), odor (anything unusual), size of the urine clump (urinary tract concerns) and parasites in the stool.

 Not all the clues reside inside the litter box. If there are not the expected number of urine clumps our sitters can alert you to this change of behavior. Peeing outside the box can be an expression of misdirected aggression (see previous post) by your cat. Somehow her environment is not to her liking and you can take steps to correct the situation.

 An abnormal litterbox does not automatically portend trouble but regular monitoring is a sure way help prevent trouble from brewing and keeping your cat happy.